Creating a resume can be tough. There are endless formats to choose from, and you’ll find conflicting information and opinions about what should and shouldn’t go on a resume. It can be overwhelming to wade through this endless stream of articles, but this one is meant to help you refine your resume specifically for manufacturing positions. Read on for the tips and to see how to apply them to a sample resume.

When you’re applying for jobs, it’s a good idea to create a different resume for each type of job you apply for. Since every employer is going to be looking for something different, use your resume to highlight your skills and show how you would be a good fit for the position. To demonstrate your qualifications, focus on your strengths and achievements instead of simply listing responsibilities that you’ve had at previous positions.


Here are some tips as you edit your resume for a manufacturing position:

Length: Keep your resume to 1 page. Hiring managers get dozens of resumes every day – so make their job as easy as possible by sharing a short, focused resume. Play around with the formatting, font size, and margins to fit everything in one page.

Formatting: An easy-to-read resume is very important. There are templates available on Google Docs or in Microsoft Word to get you started – you just have to plug in your own information. No matter the format you use, follow these tips:

  • Make sure all of your text is legible. Choose a simple font and keep the text size large enough to easily read.
  • Use color sparingly. If you do use colors other than black, make sure they are easily readable on a screen and on a printed page.
  • Make the titles of each section bold so that they are easy to see.
  • Make sure that all bullet points are lined up throughout the document.
  • Include some whitespace (or blank space) between sections of information. If everything is too crammed, it’ll be tough to read.

Contact Information: Include your full name, email address, and phone number at the top of your resume. Your email should be professionally named - no nicknames or inappropriate terms. You don’t need to include your mailing address.

Work Experience: For each position, include 2-3 bullet points, tops. You don’t have to describe literally everything you did at a job every day. Instead, focus on 2-3 of your top achievements or highlights from the position. If you worked on specific projects or products, feel free to include those.

  • For positions where your responsibilities are fairly obvious, focus on specific achievements. For example, if you were a barista, it’s well-known what those responsibilities would be. Instead of saying “Made coffee beverages by combining steamed milk, coffee, and syrup,” highlight an accomplishment, such as, “Gained recognition from management for exemplary customer service” or “Learned all beverage stations within 6 weeks.”
  • They also don’t have to be complete sentences – stick to fragments that start with verbs. Use vocabulary that shows you were active and hands-on at previous positions. Take a look at descriptions for positions you’re considering and see if you’ve had similar responsibilities. You can even use similar language to what you see in the job description, if it applies to the work you did.
  • Many of our applicants have said that they do not disclose temporary positions on resumes because they fear potential employers will not value these jobs. This couldn’t be further from the truth! For manufacturing, it is common to hold temporary positions for a few months, so please include these on your resume with a note explaining that it was a temporary or contract position. Note that the job was temporary or with a staffing firm to make sure that the hiring manager understands why you didn’t stay in the job longer. Any relevant experience can help you secure an interview.
  • If you’ve held multiple similar temporary jobs in succession, you can combine them into one “job” on your resume.

Skills: This is a section for you to highlight skills that aren’t immediately obvious from your job history, including abilities you’ve gained outside of your employment history. Do you enjoy hands-on hobbies such as woodworking or sewing at home? Did you take a jewelry-making or soldering class for fun? This is a great section to share those. Be sure to think back to the types of skills that will be necessary for the specific job you’re applying for – help the hiring manager understand why you’re a great fit for the job!

References: You don’t need to list references on your resume. The employer will ask you for your references when they’re ready to call them, probably later in the hiring process. You can keep them off for now and save the space.

File Name: Name the file “YourName Resume” so those in charge of hiring can easily find it. They read a lot of resumes, so this does them a big favor.

File Type: Although Microsoft Word .doc and .docx files used to be the standard, these days PDF files are easiest to access across different computers. Avoid .txt, .pages, or web links – these are difficult for some computers to open and may be hard to share!
With these tips in mind, let's look at a bad resume and fix it.

Resume A has some common issues seen in resumes.
Click here to download the PDF with comments
Length: It’s three pages due to long job descriptions.
Formatting: Bullet points are misaligned in some sections, and some spacing could be eliminated to help make it shorter.
Contact Information: While the name should be large and at the top, this is much too big. The mailing address is not needed.
Job Descriptions: Some are too long and include copied job descriptions from other websites, and some are too short and don’t explain what the person accomplished at the position. Some are missing information like dates.
Skills: This list is too long and includes generic skills that may not be directly relevant to a manufacturing position (though they are still great skills to have in general).
References: We don’t need these yet, and family members should not be references. They should be people you have worked with professionally.

Resume B has been edited to fix these issues.
Click here to download the PDF with comments
Length: It’s now one page.
Formatting: We fixed the bullet points and the spacing, and the mismatched fonts. We also kept some colors for flair but changed the less readable colors to black.
Contact Information: Changed the font size and deleted the mailing address.
Job Descriptions: We highlighted successes and strengths at previous positions, instead of having a straight list of just responsibilities for the more commonly-held positions of barista and customer service. We also made the job descriptions for the other jobs more specific.
Skills: We moved this to the end, so the job descriptions would be first. We also highlighted some hands-on skills, and shared examples of the less specific skills (such as organization)
References: We deleted this since we don’t need it yet!

If you’d like to use this template yourself, you can access the Google Doc template here. More templates can be found on Google Docs by going to the Template Gallery. Microsoft Word also provides several good resume templates.

If you have additional tips, or would like help editing your resume, we’d be happy to help. Email us at info@daughtersofrosie.com.

Our Blog

October 16, 2020
Hiring in a Pandemic Recession: Blessing or Curse?

Daughters of Rosie

Blog Team
October 16, 2020
5 Steps HR Leaders Are Taking During the Pandemic

Daughters of Rosie

Blog Team
October 16, 2020
How to Hire During a Pandemic

Daughters of Rosie

Blog Team
may 14, 2013
Turn Your Hands-on Hobbies Into a Hands-on Career

Daughters of Rosie

Blog Team
may 14, 2013
Applying for a Manufacturing Job? Follow These Tips

Daughters of Rosie

Blog Team
may 14, 2013
Interview Question: “What Are Your Relevant Skills?”

Daughters of Rosie

Blog Team